The Hipstography Awards 2016 – Nominees for Color Portfolio of the Year

By on janvier 23, 2017

Quels sont vos 3 portfolios préférés? Vous pouvez voter pour un seul portfolio, pour deux ou pour trois; trois étant le maximum.

Un seul vote par personne est autorisé.

Fin des votes pour cette catégorie: le jeudi 26 janvier.

Remarque pour les lecteurs francophones: étant seul à gérer le site, il m'est impossible de copier les textes accompagnants les portfolios dans les deux langues. Je n'ai donc gardé que l'anglais. Merci de votre compréhension.

 


"Moments" by Sebastian Oskar Kroll

Sebastian-Oskar-Kroll-Moments-portraitName: Sebastian Oskar Kroll
Hometown: Berlin, Germany
Resides: Berlin, Germany
Profession: Educator at a primary school
Hobbies: Hipstography, playin' drums in a Punk Band, cooking
Hipstographer since: 2013
Year of Birth: 1980

Favorite Combo:  John S  +  AO BW 
Favorite Lens:  Madalena 
Favorite Film:  Blanko 1 
Favorite Flash:  Triple Crown 

"Mobile photography is my second childhood and Hipstamatic my favorite toy."
Sebastian Oskar Kroll

 


"Digitally Painted Landscapes" by Ger van den Elzen

ger-van-den-elzen-digitally-painted-landscapes-portrait Name: Ger van den Elzen
Hometown: Venlo, Netherlands
Resides: Maastricht, Netherlands
Profession: Technical Product Specialist telecom.
Hobbies: Hipstography, music, playing guitar.
Hipstographer since: 2011
Year of Birth: 1968

Combo préféré:  Jane (40%)  +  Love 81 (41%) 
Objectif préféré:  Madalena 
Film préféré:  Rasputin 
Flash préféré:  Triple Crown 

"Five years ago, a good friend of mine told me about this fantastic iPhone App called Hipstamatic. I fell in love with it from the moment I installed it on my iPhone. Hipstamatic really changed my way of shooting pictures and most days my SLR gets replaced by the iPhone.  One of the Hipstamatic features I love the most is the Multiple Exposure Kit. Landscape photography has become one of my favorite themes. For centuries the Dutch painters made use of brush and canvas to capture their landscape scenes. Nowadays, our tools for creating "digitally" painted landscapes are Hipstamatic and our trusty iPhones. This series is an ode to all 17th century Dutch landscape painters."
Ger van den Elzen

 


"Kids of Summer" by Julia Nathanson

Julia-Nathanson-Portfolio-summer-portraitName: Julia Nathanson
Hometown: Toronto, Canada
Resides: Toronto, Canada
Profession: full-time mom/indentured servant
Hobbies: aimless wandering, yoga, Netflix
Hipstographer since: 2011
Year of Birth: 1974

Favorite Combo:  Lowy  +  Otto 
Favorite Lens: it’s evolving
Favorite Film:  Otto 
Favorite Flash: rarely use

"Childhood and summer. Both joyous and fleeting. I can still feel the heat of sticky summer nights, belly full of pie, legs swollen with bites. The rules don't apply. School’s a distant memory. TV isn’t an option. But there's always an undercurrent of darkness and mystery. The lake, as it sparkles, hints at something menacing beneath. These images evoke those childhood memories: a dreamy, fractured recollection. This is part of a larger collection, spanning four summers and five bodies of water. The subjects are my own children, my nieces, nephews, and godchildren. They work for freezies and hot dogs."
Julia Nathanson

 


"A Distant View" by Stephen Littrell

Stephen-Littrell-Distant-View-PortraitNom: Stephen Littrell
Hometown: Manhattan, Kansas
Resides: Austin, Texas
Profession: Librarian
Hobbies: Reading and traveling
Hipstographer since: 2013
Year of Birth: 1954

Favorite Combo:  Jane  +  AO BW 
Favorite Lens:  Americana 
Favorite Film:  AO BW 
Favorite Flash:  Standard 

"About a year ago I began photographing people and buildings at a distance, on my walk to and from work. Taking pictures from across a street, or high up in a building, or at the bottom of a staircase produced an interesting effect with scale. Often the human is overpowered while the built environment is magnified. This is especially so when the photograph is framed with a large amount of negative space. This mixing of scales frequently results in buildings and rooms appearing monolithic while humans seem alone and detached."
Stephen Littrell

 


"Japan- So much more than Mount Fuji" by Angelique Manchanda-Peres

Angelique-Manchanda-Peres-India-portraitName: Angelique Manchanda-Peres
Hometown: Bombay, India
Resides: Toronto, Canada
Profession: Book reviewer
Hobbies: Textiles, Photography, Plant Science, Organic cosmetics, Travel literature
Hipstographer since: 2010
Year of Birth: Ummm

Favorite Combo:  Jack London  +  Otto 
Favorite Lens:  Jack London 
Favorite Film:  Otto 
Favorite Flash: Don't have one

"Pico Iyer once said: "travel can be a fine way to learn humility and how much you don't know" and, he couldn’t have been more right, especially when you travel to Japan. This country is bursting with unique and wonderful traditions, many borne from a combination of Buddhist and Shinto influences. The big cities like Tokyo and Osaka also have a dizzying variety of countercultures, ranging from the cute to the utterly bizarre, making Street photography an absolute delight.
I used two combos here, with the predominant one being Jack London with Otto. The inkish-blue tones of this combo remind me of the shades of denim and indigo dye that Japan is well known for. As a country with nearly continuous precipitation all year round, this combo played up the overcast skies while brightening the overall subject."

Angelique Manchanda-Peres

 


"In The Lane" by Julia Nathanson

Julia-Nathanson-Portfolio-summer-portraitName: Julia Nathanson
Hometown: Toronto, Canada
Resides: Toronto, Canada
Profession: full-time mom/indentured servant
Hobbies: aimless wandering, yoga, Netflix
Hipstographer since: 2011
Year of Birth: 1974

Favorite Combo:  Lowy  +  Otto 
Favorite Lens: it’s evolving
Favorite Film:  Otto 
Favorite Flash: rarely use

""Excuse me! What are you doing back here?!" A woman was yelling at me. "I'm taking pictures of the laneway. I like taking pictures of garages and stuff," I explained. "Well, that’s dumb," she informed me.
Dumb though it may be, I continue to be inspired by the city’s laneways. Toronto has over 250 km worth, and I’ve only explored a small fraction. I’m amazed at how the same laneway appears different depending on the time of day, season, direction I’m headed, or my frame of mind. No care has been taken to impress the neighbours here. The laneways are where people park their cars, can tomatoes, learn to ride a bike. Quiet spaces where neglect fosters wild growth and where layers of peeling paint create an accidental yet irresistible beauty.

Julia Nathanson

 


 

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